5 PPC Tips for Small Businesses

PPC — it’s a staple for most small and medium-sized businesses, in one form or another. And it’s no wonder:  In their latest Economic Impact report, Google reports that “businesses generally make an average of $2 in revenue for every $1 they spend on AdWords.”

The entire process is getting smarter, too. Google’s 2017 AdWords product roadmap heavily features AI and machine learning, which they say is “critical to helping marketers analyze countless signals in real time and reach consumers with more useful ads at the right moments.”

This new technology promised to help brands track and measure the customer journey across channels, which will help ads be more relevant and yield higher returns.

At the same time, the process is becoming increasingly complex. Google is expanding their available programs, with new formats, the mobile AMP for Ads initiative, better audience targeting, the new Purchases on Google program currently in beta, etc.

PPC Tips for Small Businesses

All of this can leave SMBs floundering, and not seeing the kind of returns they expected. But there’s hope. Let’s look at five specific areas that often turn into real pitfalls for SMBs, so you can run a strategic PPC campaign that moves the right needles.

Get Real About Ad Fraud

Ad fraud is a reality that SMBs must understand and protect themselves from. Business losses from ad bot fraud are expected to reach a staggering $16.4 billion in 2017, and it’s only going to escalate from there. The Wall Street Journal reported that a single Russian ad fraud operation was costing U.S. businesses upwards of $3 million a day.

“While ad fraud is a somewhat well-known issue facing the online marketing world, it’s estimated that for every dollar marketers spend on online advertising, almost half of the value is lost due to ad fraud,” writes Stephen Hoops in SEMRush. “And while ad fraud can be committed by malicious software and human actions, the majority of ad fraud is carried out by automated bots.”

Many ad campaign managers, especially in SMBs, rely on Google and other search engines to detect fraud on their behalf.  I recently spoke to Clickcease Founder Yuval Haimov about why this might not be enough to protect your budget.

“Yes, Google does detect click fraud,” Haimov explains. “Google will typically credit AdWords account hours (or more) after the fraud takes place. Meanwhile, your ad budget is quickly exhausted and your ad could be offline for hours.”

The solution is to get a good fraud protection plan in place. For example, Clickcease offers real time reporting that highlights organic traffic versus suspicious clicks (shown in orange), automatically blocks them, and also automatically claims refunds from Google for any misspent budget dollars.

Considering how much of your ad budget is likely going to waste, the investment you’ll make in a service like this will be well worth it.

Go for the Long Tail Keywords for Best Results

Much of your success in PPC campaigns will come down to choosing the right keywords.  And it can be a challenge to get it right.

The first think you’ll want to do is look at some long tail keywords, instead of draining your budget in a flash with the highly competitive short tails. As search algorithms and search users get more sophisticated, long tail keywords are getting 70% of search traffic.

“For example, I would use the following long-tail keyword ‘short black cocktail dresses’ instead of ‘black dresses,’” explains Ronald Dod in this post on long tail keywords.

Take advantage of the free tools you can use to help undercover the right keywords. SEMrush has a great one that lets you type in your main keyword, then gives you a report of related keywords and matching phrases, along with current bid rates and search volumes.

One way for really understanding the complexities of all of this is Tim Soulo’s Ahref’s Guide to Keyword Research.

Soulo explains that your own keyword research will depend on several factors, including your website’s authority, size, your goals, budget and the competitive landscape.

It’s also important to remove underperforming keywords from your campaign as you go. You might find that only about 20% of your keywords are driving in the bulk of the revenue. Once your campaign runs for a few months, download the report and delete any that are delivering very low conversions. If you aren’t sure you want to delete them, you should at least put them on pause for a while, to avoid eating up your budget with wasted clicks.

Optimize Landing Pages

After protecting yourself against fraud, and getting the right keywords into your campaign, there’s another place to check to see if you’re wasting money.

Your campaign landing pages are often a place where the best planned campaigns can go off the rails. Several factors can come into play that will impact your bounce rate. Pop-up ads, poor page design, long load times and irrelevant content can all cause visitors to bounce. And those bounces hurt, because the cost of those clicks has already been charged to your account by the time they arrive.

Not sure what a decent bounce rate should be? Try checking your own bounce rate against your industry’s benchmark, using Google’s benchmarking tool. If you find it’s higher than it should be based on your industry or niche, the following fixes might help:

  • Make sure the content is highly relevant to the keyword.
  • Check your page load speed and take the recommended steps to improve it.
  • Get rid of pop-up ads; this is often a reason for fast bounces.
  • Make sure any links on your page open in a new window.
  • If you’re doing lead gen on your site, make sure you optimize your sign-up forms as well.

Continue to monitor your bounce rate and tweak those pages until it improves and at least meets – but ideally beats – your industry benchmark.

Get Your Budget Right

The first step in setting your PPC budget is to understand your goals.  How much do you expect to earn from new leads? What is the expected lifetime value of the customers you hope to gain? Understanding the end game will help you decide how much to spend to drive those clicks.

You’ll also want to take steps to avoid blowing through your budget too fast. This usually happens when your keywords aren’t specific enough (see above choosing the right keywords). Make sure to turn off the “broad match” option in your campaign settings, to avoid getting less targeted and less relevant traffic.

Also consider setting up some negative keywords. Adding these to your campaign will prevent your ad from being triggered by a certain word or phrase. The classic example of this is the word “free.” If you do not give free samples, free trials, or free downloads, for instance, you might not want your ad to show when someone includes “free” in their search. You can do the same for certain industry terms that are close, but not a good match, to what you offer.

At the end of the day, you have to spend enough to make an impact. It can be hard to convince yourself to do this before having any proof that it will work, but it’s a double-edged sword: You have to put a big enough commitment into to know if you’ll be getting a reasonable return.

Monitor, Test, Tweak

Finally, as in all marketing and ad campaigns, you must be disciplined about monitoring results and tracking ROI. It’s not easy: Hubspot’s State of InBound 2017 report shows that proving the ROI of marketing activities is among the top challenges business face:

Again, it goes back to understanding your goals. Are you looking for leads? You should be measuring how well they are converting. Looking for direct sales? Check revenue from those clicks.

PPC can be tough to get right, and ROI is also not the easiest thing to get a handle on.

“In paid search there are a lot of rough Adwords accounts out there,” writes Joanna Lord in MOZ. “You’ve seen them I’m sure. I know I’ve worked on them. We get brought in to assess the situation and make some big decisions around whether an account has potential or whether it would be better just to start fresh.

“This is one of the most common questions we get asked — how am I doing?” Lord continues. Moz recommends the AdWords Performance Grader, a free, quick and insightful tool that will help make sense of it all.

In spite of the ad fraud, the challenges and the discipline required to do it right, PPC still has good potential for most SMBs.  But the potential pitfalls can cost you, in a big way. With some sound strategy and the right technical support, you’ll soon be able to maximize your ROI.

Hand on Mouse Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Wondering How to Make Your PPC Rock? Read This" was first published on Small Business Trends

5 PPC Tips for Small Businesses

PPC — it’s a staple for most small and medium-sized businesses, in one form or another. And it’s no wonder:  In their latest Economic Impact report, Google reports that “businesses generally make an average of $2 in revenue for every $1 they spend on AdWords.”

The entire process is getting smarter, too. Google’s 2017 AdWords product roadmap heavily features AI and machine learning, which they say is “critical to helping marketers analyze countless signals in real time and reach consumers with more useful ads at the right moments.”

This new technology promised to help brands track and measure the customer journey across channels, which will help ads be more relevant and yield higher returns.

At the same time, the process is becoming increasingly complex. Google is expanding their available programs, with new formats, the mobile AMP for Ads initiative, better audience targeting, the new Purchases on Google program currently in beta, etc.

PPC Tips for Small Businesses

All of this can leave SMBs floundering, and not seeing the kind of returns they expected. But there’s hope. Let’s look at five specific areas that often turn into real pitfalls for SMBs, so you can run a strategic PPC campaign that moves the right needles.

Get Real About Ad Fraud

Ad fraud is a reality that SMBs must understand and protect themselves from. Business losses from ad bot fraud are expected to reach a staggering $16.4 billion in 2017, and it’s only going to escalate from there. The Wall Street Journal reported that a single Russian ad fraud operation was costing U.S. businesses upwards of $3 million a day.

“While ad fraud is a somewhat well-known issue facing the online marketing world, it’s estimated that for every dollar marketers spend on online advertising, almost half of the value is lost due to ad fraud,” writes Stephen Hoops in SEMRush. “And while ad fraud can be committed by malicious software and human actions, the majority of ad fraud is carried out by automated bots.”

Many ad campaign managers, especially in SMBs, rely on Google and other search engines to detect fraud on their behalf.  I recently spoke to Clickcease Founder Yuval Haimov about why this might not be enough to protect your budget.

“Yes, Google does detect click fraud,” Haimov explains. “Google will typically credit AdWords account hours (or more) after the fraud takes place. Meanwhile, your ad budget is quickly exhausted and your ad could be offline for hours.”

The solution is to get a good fraud protection plan in place. For example, Clickcease offers real time reporting that highlights organic traffic versus suspicious clicks (shown in orange), automatically blocks them, and also automatically claims refunds from Google for any misspent budget dollars.

Considering how much of your ad budget is likely going to waste, the investment you’ll make in a service like this will be well worth it.

Go for the Long Tail Keywords for Best Results

Much of your success in PPC campaigns will come down to choosing the right keywords.  And it can be a challenge to get it right.

The first think you’ll want to do is look at some long tail keywords, instead of draining your budget in a flash with the highly competitive short tails. As search algorithms and search users get more sophisticated, long tail keywords are getting 70% of search traffic.

“For example, I would use the following long-tail keyword ‘short black cocktail dresses’ instead of ‘black dresses,’” explains Ronald Dod in this post on long tail keywords.

Take advantage of the free tools you can use to help undercover the right keywords. SEMrush has a great one that lets you type in your main keyword, then gives you a report of related keywords and matching phrases, along with current bid rates and search volumes.

One way for really understanding the complexities of all of this is Tim Soulo’s Ahref’s Guide to Keyword Research.

Soulo explains that your own keyword research will depend on several factors, including your website’s authority, size, your goals, budget and the competitive landscape.

It’s also important to remove underperforming keywords from your campaign as you go. You might find that only about 20% of your keywords are driving in the bulk of the revenue. Once your campaign runs for a few months, download the report and delete any that are delivering very low conversions. If you aren’t sure you want to delete them, you should at least put them on pause for a while, to avoid eating up your budget with wasted clicks.

Optimize Landing Pages

After protecting yourself against fraud, and getting the right keywords into your campaign, there’s another place to check to see if you’re wasting money.

Your campaign landing pages are often a place where the best planned campaigns can go off the rails. Several factors can come into play that will impact your bounce rate. Pop-up ads, poor page design, long load times and irrelevant content can all cause visitors to bounce. And those bounces hurt, because the cost of those clicks has already been charged to your account by the time they arrive.

Not sure what a decent bounce rate should be? Try checking your own bounce rate against your industry’s benchmark, using Google’s benchmarking tool. If you find it’s higher than it should be based on your industry or niche, the following fixes might help:

  • Make sure the content is highly relevant to the keyword.
  • Check your page load speed and take the recommended steps to improve it.
  • Get rid of pop-up ads; this is often a reason for fast bounces.
  • Make sure any links on your page open in a new window.
  • If you’re doing lead gen on your site, make sure you optimize your sign-up forms as well.

Continue to monitor your bounce rate and tweak those pages until it improves and at least meets – but ideally beats – your industry benchmark.

Get Your Budget Right

The first step in setting your PPC budget is to understand your goals.  How much do you expect to earn from new leads? What is the expected lifetime value of the customers you hope to gain? Understanding the end game will help you decide how much to spend to drive those clicks.

You’ll also want to take steps to avoid blowing through your budget too fast. This usually happens when your keywords aren’t specific enough (see above choosing the right keywords). Make sure to turn off the “broad match” option in your campaign settings, to avoid getting less targeted and less relevant traffic.

Also consider setting up some negative keywords. Adding these to your campaign will prevent your ad from being triggered by a certain word or phrase. The classic example of this is the word “free.” If you do not give free samples, free trials, or free downloads, for instance, you might not want your ad to show when someone includes “free” in their search. You can do the same for certain industry terms that are close, but not a good match, to what you offer.

At the end of the day, you have to spend enough to make an impact. It can be hard to convince yourself to do this before having any proof that it will work, but it’s a double-edged sword: You have to put a big enough commitment into to know if you’ll be getting a reasonable return.

Monitor, Test, Tweak

Finally, as in all marketing and ad campaigns, you must be disciplined about monitoring results and tracking ROI. It’s not easy: Hubspot’s State of InBound 2017 report shows that proving the ROI of marketing activities is among the top challenges business face:

Again, it goes back to understanding your goals. Are you looking for leads? You should be measuring how well they are converting. Looking for direct sales? Check revenue from those clicks.

PPC can be tough to get right, and ROI is also not the easiest thing to get a handle on.

“In paid search there are a lot of rough Adwords accounts out there,” writes Joanna Lord in MOZ. “You’ve seen them I’m sure. I know I’ve worked on them. We get brought in to assess the situation and make some big decisions around whether an account has potential or whether it would be better just to start fresh.

“This is one of the most common questions we get asked — how am I doing?” Lord continues. Moz recommends the AdWords Performance Grader, a free, quick and insightful tool that will help make sense of it all.

In spite of the ad fraud, the challenges and the discipline required to do it right, PPC still has good potential for most SMBs.  But the potential pitfalls can cost you, in a big way. With some sound strategy and the right technical support, you’ll soon be able to maximize your ROI.

Hand on Mouse Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Wondering How to Make Your PPC Rock? Read This" was first published on Small Business Trends

3 Myths About Duplicate Content That Everyone Believes

You run a website and you are worried about duplicate content. Hey, everyone is. The rules are pretty clearly written in Google’s policy on the matter, yet the way those rules are enforced isn’t. No one is ever quite sure how far those guidelines go and how exactly the system for rule breaking is run.

On this issue you have to look a bit more at precedent to understand what are myths and what are realities in the world of duplicate content.

Duplicate Content Myths

These are probably the most common three myths that everyone believes, but aren’t what they seem.

Myth 1 – Internal Duplicate Content Penalty May Get Your Site Buried

I have lost track of how many blog posts I have seen talking about duplicate content penalties. Guess what… it doesn’t exist.

Let’s go back to basics: There are two ways to lose Google rankings:

  • Get hit by a manual penalty: These are always followed by a “friendly” message in your Google Search Console notifying you that your site has lost rankings for some reason
  • Get hit by an algorithmic update: These are usually confirmed by Google representatives. Google says they won’t be confirming some of the future updates (like Penguin or Panda) because they are now part of the algorithm but so far they have always been spotted by website owners. Follow people like @rustybrick and @dr_pete: They will report once anything seems to go wrong with many people’s rankings. That’s a good sign that you need to check yours too!

Now, none of Google representatives has ever confirmed the existence of “duplicate content penalty”, from what I know.

The only way duplicate content can harm your site is that Google may be confused which of non-original pages they need to rank, and they may accidentally rank the one you didn’t intend them to.

It’s a common problem for sites that run on WordPress, for example, where category and tag pages have content from your articles and because those category sections are linked a lot from around your site, they may outrank your blog posts. An easy way to troubleshoot the problem at home is to use easy tools like SE Ranking which shows you is that problem exists in your case:

3 Myths About Duplicate Content That Everyone Believes

In this case there’s no issues to worry about

You can use Yoast SEO (or an alternative plugin) to block pages you don’t want to mess with your rankings from being indexed by Google:

3 Myths About Duplicate Content That Everyone Believes

This will prevent Google from including Tag pages into their search results but Google crawlers will still be able to go there and follow the links

Here’s a commonsense explanation: Google wants only one instance of original content in their rankings: They don’t want their users to click search results and see the same content again and again. So they have to choose one instance and bring the rest down (or filter them out).

It’s not a penalty (meaning it doesn’t mean Google punishes a particular page and you need to appeal to them to get un-punished) and in most cases they are very good at picking the most suitable page. According to an interview with Matt Cutts, more than 25% of web content en masse is a duplication. They are aware of the problem and have learned to handle it well.

It’s just that you don’t ever want to get Google puzzled, so you may want to look into any possible issues on your site to give them a clearer map of what’s more important on your site.

Myth 2 – Scrapers Are a Ranking Killer

So many of my posts have been picked up by scrapers. Guess what I never bother doing? Stressing about it. Remember the thing I said about Google having learned to handle the duplicate content problem well? It applies here too!

Google had a problem with scrapers at some point, but after a few algorithm updates they pretty much got it down. The original source isn’t always automatically recognized but in most cases it will be. In others it just takes a quick investigation to clear things up.

Look at it this way: you have a website with a ton of content written by you, for your audience, within a set period of time, on a particular topic and in a particular style. The scraper has a wide array of stolen content that won’t sound the same, be consistent, be posted in a reasonable manner or following any logic. Doesn’t take a genius (or more than a basic crawler) to see what is up, right?

It doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be monitoring your content to spot the thieves. PlagiarismCheck.org is an easy way to do that. It stores all the checks, provides you with the detailed analysis of any spotted plagiarism and it’s very affordable too.

3 Myths About Duplicate Content That Everyone Believes

I like the fact that they are very transparent about the methodology making me trust their results.

Once you have spotted the biggest offenders stealing your content on a regular basis, go ahead and ask Google to remove their pages from their index.

Myth 3 – There’s No Way to Re-Use Your Content Elsewhere

Now, make sure to read this section thoroughly. Yes, you can use content you wrote wherever you want (provided you abide with policies of the website where you published it initially). No, you still don’t want to confuse Google and force them to figure out the original.

Here are a few possible scenarios and how to handle them properly:

1. You want to publish your guest post on your site to let your site subscribers access the content easily

Solution: Check with the editor and/or with official policies of the site you published your content initially. If you are ok to re-use, go ahead and publish to your own site but use the canonical tag to point Google to the original or noindex it.

2. You want to syndicate your own article to a more popular media outlet for increased exposure

Solution: Pick an outlet that enables you to add the canonical tag pointing to the page on your site. One great example of such blog is Social Media Today. They let you publish non-original content adding your URL as the source.

3. You want to re-publish your guest article to Medium or LinkedIn Long-Form Content section

If it’s the article on your own site, you’d better refrain from doing it, simply for the fear that Medium or LinkedIn page may outrank yours. Try using the outline of the original content elsewhere instead of copy-pasting the whole article. Another option is to convert your content into a new format (for example, create an infographic using Canva or design a digital brochure)

Some huge publications don’t mind you re-publishing full content elsewhere, provided you wait a few weeks and also add the “source” link at the beginning of the article. Entrepreneur is one example, so, again check the policies or ask the editor!

4. You want to translate your article and use it on a foreign media outlet

It’s a very old question which was addressed by Matt Cutts back in 2011: In short, you are safe to translate and republish the same content in multiple languages. Don’t use automated translation though (because that will be flagged as spammy). Use authentic human translation. It can be as easy as finding a well-rated Fiverr gig or hiring someone through sites like Preply. Both options are highly affordable.

Duplicate content doesn’t just mean something that appears at more than one URL. That is a reasonable thing to have once in awhile and just quoting another person will technically be duplicate content. It is about maliciously breaking the rules for your own gain. Google’s crawlers are smart and their human workers are smarter.

Between the two you can generally feel safe about your content as long as it is well written and valuable. So next time you find yourself fretting over this policy and its sometimes vague and arbitrary seeming rules just ask yourself, “Is this valuable?” If the answer is yes then you have nothing to worry about.

Copying Machine Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Believing These 3 Myths About Duplicate Content will Keep Your Business From Growing" was first published on Small Business Trends

Pizza Shop Runs Unique Loyalty Program -- Get Ink, Get Free Pizza

Washington, D.C. based pizza shop &pizza is running a promotion to generate buzz for its newest Manhattan location opening up.

If you get a tattoo of an ampersand (the ‘&’ symbol), you’ll receive free pizza for an entire year.

It all started when &pizza decided to begin paying for its employees (or as they prefer to be called — tribesmen) to get tattoos.

Many employees decided to take advantage of the policy by inking themselves with the &pizza logo itself.

Lastoria calls &pizza “an anti-establishment kind of establishment. A non chain, chain.” And since tattoos often symbolize nonconformity, he promotes it.

He said:

“We’re not doing this because we want [employees] to swear their allegiance to us like we’re some insane dictator…We’re doing it because we listen to our people. They love the symbol, they love the look of it and they love what it stands for.”

Because the only thing worse than getting a tattoo that pledges your allegiance to a capitalistic business mogul is swearing your allegiance to some insane dictator.

Here he is trying to raise the minimum wage, which doesn’t sound socialistic at all:

Lastoria himself does not have the “&” tattoo — but he’s probably just not ready to commit to it yet.

The employee tattoo policy became such a hit that &pizza has extended it to its most loyal customers, too.

When they open their latest shop in Manhattan on October 3, the first 23 people in line can get a free “&” tattoo, along with a free year of pizza. And if the past &pizza tattoo promos tell us anything, the ink is gonna be wild.

The ink-for-free-pizza promo began in Baltimore, where the first five people in line received free & tattoos. One guy apparently got an “&” that took up his entire bicep. That’s dedication.

So if you don’t want to pay for your pizza or your tattoo, and you do want to fight corporate power and capitalistic advertising hop on over to &pizza on October 3. Next month I’m hoping for a Michael Kors tattoo. I could really use a new handbag.

Pizza Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Pizza Shop Runs Unique Loyalty Program Offering Free Tattoo, Free Pizza" was first published on Small Business Trends

The Role Of AI In Digital Marketing

Artificial intelligence is something we all use in the modern day, yet we never really stop to think about how this amazing technology has evolved over just the last decade. The field of study was officially founded in 1956 but, according to Livescience, mentions of robots and artificial intelligence date back to ancient Greek, Egyptian and Chinese times. The first breakthrough in artificial intelligence was made in 1997 when the Deep Blue artificial bot developed by IBM defeated the current grandmaster in chess, Garry Kasparov. Many more breakthroughs were made later on and, today, this type of technology has become part of our daily lives.

There are many examples of how we have adopted artificial intelligence as part of our daily routines. Think about the last time you opened up the app store on your smartphone. The front page of the app store provides you with personalized recommendations. This is an excellent example of artificial intelligence.

Most smartphones today also come equipped with a virtual artificial assistant, such as Siri on Apple’s devices. These artificial assistants can perform certain tasks for you and can provide you with personalized answers based on your input. Games are probably one of the best examples. The characters in games that are not controlled by the player usually utilize some form of artificial intelligence to interact on their own and make their own decisions.

How Artificial Intelligence Fits Into the Business World

Artificial intelligence is not only useful to the average person but can also have benefits for almost any type of business out there. There are different ways in which artificial intelligence can be used by a business — sometimes to increase the productivity of employees, or to increase their exposure on the internet. Many businesses have also adopted artificial intelligence to help them cope with thousands of customer queries without having to hire new employees; thus leading to massive savings. From boosting the results of a standard display advertising campaign to ensuring the business uses the right influencers in a social media outreach campaign — artificial intelligence is now an essential part of digital marketing.

The way businesses are planning and executing digital marketing campaigns has also been affected significantly by artificial intelligence. No longer do businesses need to rely on “estimates,” as they now gain access to more accurate data than they ever had access to before. Businesses are utilizing artificial intelligence during every part of the digital marketing process, from the planning stage, through the production stage and even after the campaign has ended, to help them track the results and identify potential shortcomings. All of this will enable them to improve their future campaigns.

AI in Digital Marketing

To better understand just how much of an impact artificial intelligence can have on a business’s digital marketing strategies, let’s discuss some of the ways this technology can be utilized for a more successful marketing campaign bringing in more customers and making it easier to convert those customers into sales.

1. Search Engine Optimization

Let’s start with one of the most important subjects businesses tackle when it comes to digital marketing — this being search engine optimization. In the beginning, search engine optimization does not have as significant an impact as perhaps paid-per-click advertising would have, but when a business spends some time on optimizing its website, targeting keywords and building good backlinks, it can reach top rankings in Google and get thousands of targeted visitors to its website.

The most significant way in which artificial intelligence is changing the way businesses are planning and executing their search engine optimization strategies comes into play with the latest tools that are readily available to be used, such as SEMRush and WordStream. These tools utilize artificial intelligence to analyze a website’s structure and content, then provide the marketer with personalized solutions to help them rank better in search engines, such as changes they can make to their website, new keywords they can target or backlink, opportunities they can use to get better rankings. According to an article published on Forbes, the particular area where artificial intelligence may be the most useful is the way this technology specifies exactly how a marketer can utilize keywords and other elements in existing content for better performance in Google and, of course, the other major search engines.

2. Ad Delivery

Since paid-per-click advertising is a particular type of marketing technique that businesses tend to utilize excessively, especially when the company’s website is not yet ranking high in search engines, we should also discuss how artificial intelligence is affecting this particular type of digital marketing strategy. There are two primary ways in which artificial intelligence is used in online advertising.

Businesses are now able to provide certain advertising networks, with Google AdWords and Facebook Ads being the most popular examples, with a few keywords, and the artificial intelligence behind these advertising technologies will then automatically suggest the best keywords to target, based on the ones added by the marketer. In some cases, a simple URL of a website would include popular hundreds to thousands of potential keywords to target as the technology can analyze the content of the URL entered and suggested the best keywords to target for attracting visitors to the website.

This isn’t all there is too artificial intelligence and paid online advertising. Once keywords have been decided on, a marketer can input a daily or campaign budget, and the technology will then automatically decide how much the marketer should pay for every click that is sent to their website. This cost can fluctuate during the day — when there is more competition, the technology may allocate more money to each click for the particular marketer to ensure their ads are more visible. Search Engine Land explains that artificial intelligence has evolved to the level where no human interaction is even needed, and the advertising campaign is completely automated by the artificial technology behind the platform.

In addition to the above-mentioned advantages that artificial intelligence brings businesses who are advertising online, we should also note that artificial intelligent technology has been implemented into ad delivery services of many networks — including Google AdWords and Facebook. The technology that was implemented in these networks can analyze data of the visitors — the people to whom ads are displayed — and then draw up and display adverts that will spark an interest to particular visitors; thus offering a more personalized ad experience to the visitors and better value to the advertiser. There are numerous ways in which this particular feature can be beneficial, including with other types of marketing, such as blogger outreach campaigns.

3. Split Testing

Artificial intelligence is also an excellent strategy for split testing different types of campaigns to find what works and what does not work. Many ad networks have already implemented split testing abilities into their artificial technology to help business owners reach more customers without wasting money on advertisements that do not work for them.

A marketer can link multiple ad sets together and then the artificial technology, embedded into the ad network’s platform, will monitor the performance of the ad sets that were linked together. In some cases, with the marketer’s permission, the artificial technology will automatically make some minor adjustments in the campaigns that are running to make them more effective.

In addition to this, the technology will also slow down the campaigns or even stop them in some case if they are not doing well. The ones that are doing well can then be automatically be boosted by the technology so that those ads can be served more frequently to visitors. By doing this, the marketer and the business owner can benefit from the fact that campaigns that are not doing well will not waste them any extra money, and they would not have to continuously check in on the performance of their campaign — which would waste quite a significant amount of time — since the artificial technology will do this for them.

With split testing, marketers can test out different types of ad sets — such as different banners that they had designed to see which banners attract the most visitors, or a variety of headlines and call-to-actions, which helps them identify what type of text they should use when they are compiling new adverts. The results they obtain here can also be used in future advertising campaigns as the marketer can mirror the text and graphics that were present on the most successful past campaigns in new campaigns to ensure they do well from the very first time they are executed.

Conclusion

Technology is rapidly evolving, and artificial intelligence is one particular sector that has seen a lot of attention and development lately. Businesses have also noticed that artificial intelligence can help them increase their reach and revenue, by employing this technology in different sectors of the company.

Digital marketing is one of the best sectors to employ artificial intelligent technology in, offering a business the opportunity to reach the best and widest range of consumers, offer them expertly crafted messages and converting the audience into long-standing customers — without having to hire hundreds of employees to handle the intrigued tasks that artificial intelligence can bring the company.

AI Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Artificial Intelligence Secrets Revealed: 3 Impacts for Digital Marketers" was first published on Small Business Trends