The Come Up

A while ago I wrote about how Apple is changing consumer behavior and how they essentially ruled the world.

Man, how times have changed.

Apple release its second quarter earnings back in March. Though the company brought in $50.6 billion (yes, that’s a B) it’s down for the first time in thirteen years. Don’t be fooled, Apple is doing just fine. They have more than enough money.

The company has to be a little shaken though. Last year the company posted $58 billion in revenue for its second quarter. That’s a 13% drop when comparing the two quarters.

The reason Apple has seen a minimal decline is because its main rival, Samsung, have found a way to compete with the tech giant.

Samsung figured out that their tech will probably not, or at least not right now, match Apple’s so they’ve taken an alternative route. Samsung has jumped into the race by offering a variety of watches, phones, and other products that Apple doesn’t make.

They’ve even jumped into the virtual reality business.

Apple’s products are a one size fits all while Samsung allows you to shop for your size. A risk that is starting to pay dividends.

The thing that’s still working in Apple’s favor is their operating system and their fan’s loyalty to them. I’ve had an iPhone for years and I can’t dream of going anywhere else. That kind of brand loyalty is what still makes Apple a giant and the leader. Samsung is slowly closing the gap and Apple has to be looking over their shoulder.

If not then don’t be surprised is Samsung bites them in the…….

As always, thanks for reading.



You There?

It happens every morning.

Ten minutes before my alarm goes off my phone lights up and I roll over to see what it is. Most of the time I think the worst because….I’m me but most of the time it’s an annoying email from someone wanting me to buy something.

I’m sure it’s happened to you, too. You’re waiting for that text back, an important phone call, an email, only to be disappointed by an email blast.

The question is, are they still effective?

Yes, having email marketing campaigns are a great way to reach multiply people in a short amount of time. The question is how does one make people read the material? We live in a time where marketing emails are like commercials, we skip them whenever we can. They seem to be more of a nuisance than anything else.

I don’t have all the answers but here are a few ways to make sure your email not only gets opened, but read.

First, add a coupon. This only applies to emails from businesses that sell things (duh) but the best way to keep people from clicking unsubscribe is to save them money. It’s also a great way to grow your email list, which is the goal to begin with.

If you’re not selling anything then you have to focus on having exceptional content. That is the key to anything related to advertising. Content is king and as long as your content is superb then the chances of your email being read grow exponentially.

Timing is also an important, and tricky, skill to master. When will your consumer be more than likely to read your email? Is it in the morning when they wake up? (probably not) Is it during work hours? You must figure out the optimal time to send your email. If not, it’s going to the trash and quickly.

I wish I had more for you but as the Joker once said, “If you’re good at something never do it for free.”

On that note, I’m out.

As always, thanks for reading.



Crack the Code 

Apple is in a war.

The FBI wants the tech giant to write a code that will unlock the phone of the San Bernardino shooter. Apple has objected saying that making that code creates a backdoor to their iOs system, leaving the opportunity for hackers to infiltrate iPhones everywhere.

This isn’t going to be about if Apple is wrong or right and the ethics behind the story. We’ve already talked about how Apple is re-writing consumer behavior. The next chapter of this book is about trust.

No matter what the outcome maybe Apple has already won in the PR category. By standing up the FBI and refusing to create a code that has the potential to harm customers; Apple has drawn a line in the sand in defense of their clients.

Nothing creates loyalty like someone standing up for you. Apple is indirectly building their brand in a way that a lot of companies can’t, and wouldn’t do.

If Android runs into a similar situation (I hope not) and creates a code that has the potential to put their customers in a vulnerable state then Apple will look even better. Brand equity is so important in the era of social media. We’ve seen companies that don’t have it and crumble once a scandal hits. If the people don’t trust your brand then it’s only a matter of time before you’re exposed.

Apple will fight this until the bitter  end, and their customers are glad to see that.

As always, thanks for reading.